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  • re: Performance and Scalability Myths

    I think we agree - but we are talking about two separate things: First, there is the &quot;design for performance&quot; trap that leads people to complex distributed designs that actually make everything slower because of the network latency etc. This is bad bad bad. Design for the simple case, then refactor as necessary. Then, there is ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-23-2006
  • re: Performance and Scalability Myths

    Good design always requires a lot of discipline. For example, one time I was working with a a guy on my team that said that it would be a very easy to fix a particular problem by inserting a small hack in a certain module. And he was going on and on about how to do it. I had to stop him and tell him that no matter how much he explained it, all I ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-22-2006
  • Performance and Scalability Myths

    &quot;When I hear the word performance I reach for my gun&quot;. In the fuzzy front end of a project when unknowns abound people need a sense of stable footing. Since it usually takes a long (calendar) time to understand the requirements and domain discussions tend to focus on more concrete things like the application architecture, and ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-20-2006
  • ScrumMaster Certifications

    As of today everybody in Ative is a certified ScrumMaster. It has been a great course taught by Jens &Oslash;stergaard and Jeff Sutherland, &quot;the father of Scrum&quot;. We are looking forward to bringing the full Scrum arsenal to work for helping our clients create better software faster.&nbsp; &nbsp;
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-13-2006
  • Refactoring The Physical Workspace

    Agile development is all about stacking the deck in favour of success. We continuously adapt the application and process to improve it. In code, this is called refactoring - rearranging the parts to a simpler, more manageable form. But it does not end here. You should refactor your workspace, too. We just did that on my current ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-13-2006
  • re: Agility is...

    This reminds me of a senior project manager who told that he knew the team could not meet its next deadline but he kept it secret in order not to kill their motivation. Apparently he thought the team would not notice that their velocity was too low or that maybe if he didn't do anything they would work faster... Unfortunately this kind of ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-08-2006
  • re: Notes on Mainframe Migration

    You are absolutely right. For some reason, however, the object revoluation never truly made it into the mainstream - sure, there are lots of systems built in OO languages out there but a lot of them lack a proper domain model. It is always easy to pick on the mainframe systems out there but a lot of newer systems lack it too. Just look at any ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-08-2006
  • Why Acceptance Tests Matter

    While consulting on a migration project I was refactoring the way to load country reference data when I noticed some oddities in the business rules for formatting phone and fax numbers. I had changed from loading based on hard-coded country codes to using an Enum and mapping it to the correct instance in persistence layer. One of the methods to ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-06-2006
  • Ugly Code - Exception Handling Anti-Pattern

    A message of despair from a consultant friend: I am working on a project and we have to deliver &quot;the complete product&quot; in 1 1/2 weeks. This morning i stumbled on this &quot;Pattern&quot; two places in one of our applications (WinApp) - now I am too afraid to look at the rest of the code base: catch(System.Exception ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 10-03-2006
  • Bug-by-Bug Compatibility

    When you are porting an old system you will often be confronted with the pragmatic decision to be bug-by-bug compatible with the old system at the integration points, since it is sometimes not feasible to fix the bugs in the clients to the system. On the other hand, we have the principle of &quot;Don&#39;t propagate a bad decision.&quot; So the ...
    Posted to Ative at Work (Weblog) by Martin Jul on 09-29-2006
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